FSU Amazonia Week: A call for land and cultural survival

 

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — Florida State University’s College of Arts and Sciences and the Department of Modern Languages and Linguistics will welcome experts from around the world for an interdisciplinary summit on critical issues affecting the future of the Amazon Monday, March 2 through Wednesday, March 4.

The summit will encourage attendees to examine the biological, environmental and humanitarian challenges in the Amazon and serve as a call to action for global intervention in this endangered region. Associate Professor Patricia Vieira from Georgetown University will give a keynote presentation at 4 p.m. Monday, March 2, on “Movies of the Move: Cinematic Travels in the Amazon.”

The Amazon encompasses 40 percent of South America. It extends across nine countries and includes over 300 indigenous languages and cultures as well as four European languages. It is the site of historic and continued conflict, as well as being the largest and most biodiverse rainforest in the world.

Events will include:

Monday, March 2

Strozier Library, Bradley Reading Room: 4-6 p.m.

  • Opening reception and photography exhibition with student presentations: “El alma del río” (The Soul of the River) by Spanish photographer Juanjo Fernández
  • Keynote presentation: "Movies of the Move: Cinematic Travels in the Amazon." Associate Professor Patricia Vieira, Georgetown University

Askew Center, Student Life Cinema: 7 p.m.

  • Introduction: “Rising Violence and Disturbing Trends,” a report by Marcos Colón, Florida State University
  • Film screening: “A New Minamata” (2020) by Brazilian filmmaker Jorge Bodanzky. There will be a Q-and-A discussion after the screening.

Tuesday, March 3

Strozier Library, Bradley Reading Room: 4-7 p.m.

Panel: A Threatened Environment and Strategies for the Survival of Amazonia

  • "Land Without History: An Environmental Approach to the Amazon.” Valeria Meiller, Georgetown University
  • “Benefits of Environmental Conservation in Protected Natural Areas in Peru.” Biologist Herman Ruiz Abecasís, director of the Allpahuayo-Mishana National Reserve, Loreto, Perú
  • “Projects with Added Value in Agribusiness and Aquaculture in the Loreto Region.” Margoth Del Rocío Orbe Peixoto. Instituto Tecnológico de la Producción, ITP, Ministerio de la producción, Iquitos-Perú
  • “Value of Fishery and Other Non-Timber Resources in the Peruvian Amazon.” Biologist Adela Ruiz Arce, Instituto Tecnológico de la Producción, ITP, Ministerio de la producción, Iquitos-Perú

Wednesday, March 4

Strozier Library, Bradley Reading Room: 4-7 p.m.

Panel: Culture and Environmental Crisis in the Amazon

  • "Multimodal Mobility: the Motocarristas of Iquitos, Perú Through Poetry, Photography, and Interviews.” William Boose (FSU alumnus), University of Florida
  • "What Transformational Beings in Amazonian Folktales Can Teach Us About Sustainable Living.” Chanelle Dupuis, Florida State University
  • “Plastic for Food: A Traveler’s Look into Pollution in the Peruvian Amazon.” Evan Kelsch, Florida State University
  • “Field Notes and Photographs of Pacaya Samiria National Reserve.” Biologist Diego Mejía Prado, Florida State University

Closing reception

All events are free and open to the public.